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Tuesday, June 25 • 15:00 - 16:30
Coastal landscapes and childhood(s) transition accross three generations and four countries. (2)

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Chaired by: Kjørholt, A.T.

Coastal landscapes and childhood(s)in transition across three generations and four countries
Anne Trine Kjørholt
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)


Contemporary coastal childhoods are connected to growing up in societies characterized by rapid transition with regard to economies and working life, livelihood, identity formation and intergenerational relations. Knowledge and skills, transmitted from one generation to the next through practices in everyday life is to a great extent replaced by schooling as the valued form of education. Thus, we witness shifting and competing forms of knowledge production over time. There is a danger of both deskilling, and of a devaluation of life-skills, practical, and environmental local knowledge that is of vital importance to maintain and further develop sustainable livelihoods in different coastal communities. Furthermore, children and young people’s lives are affected byincreasing individualisationWhile children some decades ago were brought up to be of use for their families and communities, they are today brought up to ‘be themselves’. Many of the contemporary coastal societies are ethnically diverse, arising questions of inclusion, exclusion and (dis)connectedness. These and other changes have wide-ranging implications for present everyday life and future development of sustainable coastal societies. In this panel we explore coastal landscapes and childhood(s)in transition across three generations and five countries. All the participants are part of the interdisciplinary research project; Valuing the past, sustaining the future. Education, knowledge and identity across three generations in coastal communities, at NTNU, funded by Research Council Norway.

This panel is part of a series of 2 sessions. It includes:
1. Paper presentations: 7 paper presentations+1 discussant
2. A round table entitled: Coastal childhoods in a comparative perspective. Young peoples’ experiences and perspectives. Presentation and dialogue among researchers from 4 countries (60 min).

Literature/paper presentations:

-  Childhoods through time: Children’s experiences of childhood across three generations from two coastal villages in Cyprus
Spyros Spyrou & Eleni Theodorou


Contemporary coastal childhoods are connected to growing up in societies characterized by rapid transition with regard to economies and working life, livelihood, identity formation and intergenerational relations. Knowledge and skills, transmitted from one generation to the next through practices in everyday life is to a great extent replaced by schooling as the valued form of education. Thus, we witness shifting and competing forms of knowledge production over time. There is a danger of both deskilling, and of a devaluation of life-skills, practical, and environmental local knowledge that is of vital importance to maintain and further develop sustainable livelihoods in different coastal communities. Furthermore, children and young people’s lives are affected by increasing individualisation. While children some decades ago were brought up to be of use for their families and communities, they are today brought up to ‘be themselves’. Many of the contemporary coastal societies are ethnically diverse, arising questions of inclusion, exclusion and (dis)connectedness. These and other changes have wide-ranging implications for present everyday life and future development of sustainable coastal societies. In this panel we explore coastal landscapes and childhood(s)in transition across three generations and five countries. All the participants are part of the interdisciplinary research project; Valuing the past, sustaining the future. Education, knowledge and identity across three generations in coastal communities, at NTNU, funded by Research Council Norway.

-  Growing up in a Norwegian coastal town in the 19th century. Work and intergenerational relations. 
Ellen Schrumpf


The paper is about how young boys growing up in a coastal town in Norway in the 19th century learned skills and became sailors aboard on a ship at a very young age. Young boys hired aboard together with their fathers. Practical knowledge was transfered from the one generation to the next.

-A review of local oriented and intergenerational educational programs in coastal communities in Norway 1970- 2019 
Tobias Johansson

This paper is linked to the PhD-project: Models for intergenerational knowledge transfer in Norwegian coastal communities within the interdisciplinary research project: Valuing the past, sustaining the future. Education, knowledge, identity across three generations in coastal communities. This project is funded by Research Council Norway and directed by professor Anne Trine Kjørholt, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

The aim of the paper is to present a review of educational projects linked to local oriented and intergenerational programs and practices in Norwegian coastal communities from 1970 to present time. This status of knowledge represents the first step towards the overall aim of the PhD study which is to develop new local oriented and intergenerational models for transfer of knowledge in upper secondary schools in coastal communities. In the paper I will link the presentation to discussion of marine epistemologies and different forms of knowledge production in coastal communities across time. The PhD study is addressing questions related to how educational systems can integrate relevant knowledge for young people in coastal communities, contributing to the economic, cultural and social sustainability of living close to the sea. It also raises the question of relevant education in geographically remote areas like the north Norwegian peninsula and what impact educational institutions have in a historically marginalised area close to the sea. Finally, it calls for intergenerational perspectives on education, emphasising continuity and belonging across generations.



Tuesday June 25, 2019 15:00 - 16:30
REC A2.06 Roeters Eiland Complex, University of Amsterdam