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Tuesday, June 25 • 15:00 - 16:30
Transdiciplinary Fisheries Sciences for Blue Justice: The need to Go Between, Across and Beyond. (1)

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Chaired by: Schreiber, M. & Chuenpagdee, R.

Transdisciplinary Fisheries Sciences for Blue Justice: The Need to Go Between, Across and Beyond
Milena Arias Schreiber & Ratana Chuenpagdee

Transdisciplinary research has been brought forward as a means to solve and mitigate real-world problems including fisheries. The Global Research Network Too Big To Ignore (TBTI) is inviting scientists who are interested in ‘transdisciplinary’ research to present their ideas about how to bridge gaps by going between, across and beyond disciplines in working towards ‘blue justice’ for ocean users and sustainability. In this special session, we want to explore the reasons for the lack of transdisciplinarity, the challenges and lessons to apply it, and how this affects fisheries and ocean sustainability under the Bluegrowth agenda, especially how it may exacerbate the marginalization of small-scale fisheries.


Illuminating Hidden Harvests: The contribution of small-scale fisheries to sustainable development
Nicole Franz 

FAO, WorldFish and Duke University are working in partnership with global experts to assess the contributions of small-scale fisheries (SSF). The presentation will provide a progress update on this ambitious project as well as discuss opportunities for applying the methodological approaches and frameworks developed under the project to promote knowledge integration to promote sustainable SSF. This study is a key effort designed to fortify growing momentum in implementing the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines), and action on the Sustainable Development Goals. The research builds on the initial 2012 Hidden Harvest study and encompasses pre-harvesting, harvesting and post-harvesting sectors of inland and marine fisheries.


Integrated approach to strengthen small-scale fishing vessel management in Indonesia
Irna Sari, Rifki Furkon, Irene Sahertian & Alan White

Small-scale fisheries are the dominant player in Indonesian that need to be monitored. The Indonesian policy requires vessel registration but exempts the fishers from licensing obligations. There is uncertainty over the pressure on fish stock of small-scale fishing because of insufficient of vessel management and self-registration by fishers. This presentation will share lessons learned and recommendations to move towards transdisciplinary research to advise practice in managing small-scale fisheries. It is a system consisting of many interrelated and interdependent factors dependent on transdisciplinary knowledge and actions underpinned by fisheries science, technology, gender inclusion, social marketing, and political, social, legal and institutional arrangements.


Transdisciplinary research framing promoted by small-scale fishers in Lake Malawi
Tetsu Sato, John Banana Matewere

Co-design of research framing addressing imminent challenges facing vulnerable sectors including small-scale fishers is critically important to promote transdisciplinary fisheries research involving researchers of diverse disciplines and various non-academic actors, because it requires integration of all necessary knowledge derived from diverse sources inside and outside academia. Based on our case study of innovative resource enhancement practices by a group of small-scale fishers of Lake Malawi, we discuss impacts of transdisciplinary processes driven by small-scale fishers upon mobilizing collaboration among fishers, scientists from different disciplines, administrators and local community actors to co-create sustainable, equitable and legitimate options of fisheries resource management.


Crossing interdisciplinary bridges to build effective conservation actions supporting fishers
Vandick da Silva Batista, Nidia Noemi Fabré, João Vitor Campos e Silva, Ana Cláudia Mendes Malhado & Richard Ladle 

Bio-ecological studies are increasingly done and published giving basis to managing biodiversity to reach conservation objectives. However, societies management is not being effective around conservation purposes as it is done to other purposes, like products sales, political campaigns and spreading fake news. Analysis including identification of cultural, institutional and psychological profiles to increase the effective participation of conservation scientists on the management of protected areas and in open area systems. A framework interacting those disciplines with ecology related disciplines will be presented focusing on tipping points to cross interdisciplinary bridges for a more effective evidence-based conservation science.


When is resilience sustainable? A critical analysis of the challenges facing the English small-scale fleet and their varying responses
Rebecca Korda, Tim Gray, Selina Stead

The viability of the English small-scale fisheries sector – the so-called ‘under-tens’ - is at risk. This work examines the challenges facing the under-ten fleet and identifies the primary causes of its vulnerability. It then investigates three coping strategies adopted by the fleet, discussing the reasons why different fisheries communities choose different approaches, and how management can influence those choices. By highlighting these factors, the research aims to help shape the way future onshore fisheries policy is constructed, so that more support can be given to the English small-scale sector.


Transdisciplinary Fisheries Sciences for Blue Justice: The Need to Go Between, Across and Beyond
Sisir Kantha Pradhan

Transdisciplinary research has been brought forward as a means to solve and mitigate real-world problems including fisheries. Yet, in most cases, research projects remain excluding many disciplines and crucial stakeholders and lack institutional frameworks that allow for the share, discussion and integration of ideas and visions for the oceans . In the new context of the “Blue Economy,” which is gaining popularity as observed at the recent conference in Kenya, the looming absence of transdisciplinarity and the lack of integration of different kinds of knowledge threaten the viability of many ocean users, especially small-scale fisheries that constitute the majority. To rectify the situation, Too Big To Ignore (TBTI) Global Research Network is inviting scientists who are interested in ‘transdisciplinary’ research to present their ideas about how to bridge the gaps by going between, across and beyond disciplines in working towards ‘blue justice’ for ocean users and ocean sustainability. In this special session, we want to explore the reasons for the lack of transdisciplinarity, the challenges and lessons to apply it, and how this affects fisheries and ocean sustainability, especially how it may exacerbate the marginalization of small-scale fisheries. Further, we are interested in learning about methodological approaches, frameworks and initiatives that have been successful at knowledge integration. Ultimately, we will reflect on the lessons learned and develop strategies for concerted efforts as we move towards the Ocean Decade in 2021.


Tuesday June 25, 2019 15:00 - 16:30
REC A1.02 Roeters Eiland Complex, University of Amsterdam