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Wednesday, June 26 • 13:00 - 14:30
Blue Justice for small-scale fisheries in the context of fishing opportunities and markets: A lens for SDG14b. (1)

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Chaired by: Said, A., & Pascual-Fernandez, J.

Blue Justice for small-scale fisheries in the context of fishing opportunities and markets: A lens for SDG14b
Alicia Said & Jose Pascual-Fernández
Institut Universitaire Européen de la Mer & Universidad de La Laguna


The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has raised the profile of small-scale fisheries through SDG14b, a target that calls for the provision of ‘access of small-scale artisanal fishers to marine resources and markets’. Considered as /a historic moment for small-scale fisheries, their recognition in the SDGs is an important milestone that sets an important focus on how such target ought to be achieved. Reaching this milestone requires overhauls in governance structures and management systems that have traditionally favoured other segments of the fishing fleets, mainly industrial and large-scale fisheries supposedly more “efficient”. This is particularly relevant in the era of “Blue Growth” that in many of its formulations exclude fisheries, and particularly small-scale fisheries (SSF), privileging new sectors, potentially increasing the challenges for SSF. Hence, achieving access to fishing opportunities and markets, a.k.a. SDG14b, would require adjustments in resource governance and fisheries management systems in all sectors, and development programs that embed concepts like human rights, social justice and equity as key elements of what we refer to as Blue Justice. In this session, we seek to provide case studies from around the world to showcase the governance challenges and opportunities concerning the planned or accomplished implementation of SDG14b, along with lessons about the importance of focusing strongly on the issues and concerns related to SSF as we strive to achieve the overall SDGs. The session invites experts from different regions to bring together a global discussion on governance transformations in the broader picture to decipher challenges and inform new policies that bring about blue justice in ocean and resource governance.


Bluefin tuna quota access for small-scale fisheries in the Canary Islands: fighting for recognition
Jose Pascual Fernández, Carmelo Dorta Morales, Álvaro Díaz de la Paz

Bluefin tuna has been a target for small-scale fisheries in the Canary Islands since many decades ago, as historical documents assert. The catches of bluefin tuna by these fleets had been strong, achieving a mean of a 16% of the total catches of bluefin tuna in Spain from 1965 to 1980. After this period the percentage of catches of the canarian fleet diminished strongly for a variety of reasons, including the reduction of the stocks caused by the development of purse seiners and long line fleets targeting this specie in the Mediterranean and the Atlantic. When in 2008 quotas for this specie were established, small-scale fleets in Spain, and the Canary Islands in particular, got negligible quotas while a small number of purse seiners could concentrate most of the fishing rights. Especially in the last years, a strong conflict has developed between small-scale fisher organizations in the region, regional government and the national government in charge of distributing quotas. Scientific advise has had an important role to highlight the inconsistencies of the national policies due to the historical records of catches by small-scale fleets, added to the evaluation of their economic and environmental comparative benefits. In this paper we will analyse the key elements of these processes, taking into account national and EU regulations, especially Art. 17 of the CFP, and the role of small-scale fisher organizations and scientist. As a consequence of this conflict, the quota for bluefin tuna in the Canary Islands has consistently increased in the last years.


Strengthening the Science Policy Interface: Using the SSF Guidelines to Inform Inclusive and Just Achievement of SDG Target 14.b
Joe Zelasney, et al.

An essential component of FAO’s work to promote implementation of the SSF Guidelines involves strengthening the science-policy interface by sharing knowledge and supporting policy reform, with the aim to ensure that national and regional policies embrace the principles of the SSF Guidelines and facilitate achieving SDG 14.b. The presentation will introduce the international governance framework for fisheries, focusing on the SSF Guidelines, and related instruments and processes that support and inform inclusive and just “Blue Growth” development, as well as initiatives to achieve SDG target 14.b. The presentation will further discuss findings from a FAO Technical Paper, “Supporting application of Chapter 7 of the SSF Guidelines – Value Chains, Post-Harvest, and Trade”, featuring case studies that highlight successful initiatives, and showcase governance challenges and opportunities to enhance small-scale fisheries to achieve SDG target 14.b in a way that is inclusive and just.


Small-scale fisheries access to fishing opportunities in Europe: a new hope? 
Alicia Said, et al.

The UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) has raised the profile of small-scale fisheries through SDG14b, a target that calls for the provision of ‘access of small-scale artisanal fishers to marine resources and markets’. Considered as a historic moment for small-scale fisheries, their recognition in the SDGs is an important milestone that sets an important focus on how such target ought to be achieved. In certain cases, reaching this milestone requires overhauls in governance structures and management systems that have traditionally favoured other segments of the fishing fleets, mainly industrial and large-scale fisheries. In the EU, on the other hand, the existing Article 17 of Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) provides a legal basis for improving the situation of small-scale fisheries. While mostly the allocation of quota within member states is based on historical catches, the 2013 reform of the CFP introduced Article 17 which requires Member States to use transparent and objective criteria including those of an environmental, social and economic nature when allocating fishing opportunities, and to effectively provide incentives to SSF fishing vessels. Adapting the governance and management systems to better account for all types of fisheries requires systemic research that looks at the broader picture to decipher the challenges, and inform new policies. This article focuses on the situation of the allocation of fishing opportunities in Europe and the access regime for small-scale fishers, to evaluate the potential of individual countries and ultimately the EU in achieving the SDG14b. Specifically, the paper seeks to identify reasons that hinder wider adoption of Article 17 of the CFP that sets the ground for transformations in the allocation systems at the national level to explore systemic challenges of SSF governance and viability.









Wednesday June 26, 2019 13:00 - 14:30
REC A1.05 Roeters Eiland Complex, University of Amsterdam