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Thursday, June 27 • 15:00 - 16:30
Enhancing fisheries governability

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Chaired by: Johnsen, J.P.

Strengthening Fisheries Governability through Human Behaviour Research in Atlantic Canada.

Human behaviour is an underexamined aspect of the governability of fishery systems. The governance of small-scale fisheries in Canada is no exception. Human behaviour is defined here as individual action that results from the cognitive processing of past, current, or imagined sensory information from social and biophysical environments. As a result, human behaviour is an important lens through which we can identify opportunities to strengthen governability by understanding fishers’ motivations to cooperate, share resources, follow rules, and respond to social-ecological change. This research draws on experiences with the governance of mixed inshore fisheries (e.g., shrimp, crab, lobster, cod) in Newfoundland, Canada and documents fisher behaviours, including the motivations behind decisions to invest, leave, diversify or join a fishery. To examine fisher behaviour and the implications for governability of mixed fisheries, several methods of data collection and analysis were used, including storytelling methods with fishers, fish processors, and fishing community residents, analysis of Atlantic Canadian fisheries policies, and a q-methodology activity with academics and governance actors to assess their subjective support for considering fisher behaviour at the policy level. Results reveal contradictions among actor perspectives about considering how and why fishers invest, leave, diversify and join a fishery that shape the capacity to address multiple social, economic, cultural, and ecological objectives. Furthermore, the structures and processes of governance were found to reinforce behavioural contradictions, as for example with limited capacity for coordination across governmental sectors and with academic social scientists, thus indicating systematic barriers to the strengthening fisheries governability in Atlantic Canada. As this research shows, an integrative and practical understanding of fisher behaviour is needed to help understand and address multiple objectives for the long-term sustainability of small-scale fisheries, and to develop policy processes with capacity to leverage human behaviour to strengthen governability.


From the mouths of stakeholders: understanding the need for innovative fisheries co-management
Debbi Pedreschi, Hannes Höffle, Audric Vigier, Keith Farnsworth & David G. Reid

The need for innovative forms of environmental governance has never been more urgent. In the face of much political and environmental uncertainty, managers need methods capable of responding to, and adapting with, the resource being exploited, and the operational, political, and legislative frameworks in which they operate. Real-time incentive (RTI) fisheries management is an innovative, adaptable framework, capable of responding in close to real-time to environmental/ecological data, whilst incorporating multiple biological, social and economic objectives. The RTI system presents an opportunity for developing a management system to support sustainable fisheries, whilst collaborating with stakeholders to develop a co-management approach that changes the choice architecture and provides avenues for inclusion of non-economic social objectives.
Here we present the experiences of the Celtic Sea RTI project which is working with stakeholders to share knowledge in order to develop a common understanding of management issues, identify opportunities for innovation along with barriers to implementation, and construct scenarios for management-strategy evaluation (MSE). We present the journey thus far as the lived experience of fishers informs understanding of historical conflict across various actors and policies that has led to the complexity of the status quo, and how we can use this information to move forward to more inclusive, holistic, and sustainable fisheries.


Framing the ‘problem’ in fisheries management: conversations with stakeholders and policy makers in Piura, Perú
Christopher Giordano

Northern Peru is a region rich in natural resources and cultural history. With coastal occupation from at least 150 B.C.E, the area is home to the highest concentration of artisanal fishermen and marine biodiversity within the country. Communication barriers between actors engaged in management of the coastal system has led to fragmented imaginings, including the ‘problems’ it faces in achieving improved management. One division of actors could be that artisanal fishermen and those selected to manage them. This paper explores This paper explores the differences and similarities of vision in current governance needs between these two groups, and how they believe governance problems must be resolved. It draws on a series of interviews and workshops conducted in 2018 with fishermen, their representatives, government regulators, and university researchers to produce 7 overarching categories of problems, their relative importance, and the perceived mechanisms for resolution. The paper concludes that despite identification of similar barriers to improved management, the discrepant placement of responsibility stems from distinct driver conceptualizations on the part of both actor groups.


Strengthening Fisheries Governability through Human Behaviour Research in Atlantic Canada
Evan J. Andrews, Jeremy Pittman & Derek Armitage

Human behaviour is an underexamined aspect of the governability of fishery systems. The governance of small-scale fisheries in Canada is no exception. Human behaviour is defined here as individual action that results from the cognitive processing of past, current, or imagined sensory information from social and biophysical environments. As a result, human behaviour is an important lens through which we can identify opportunities to strengthen governability by understanding fishers’ motivations to cooperate, share resources, follow rules, and respond to social-ecological change. This research draws on experiences with the governance of mixed inshore fisheries (e.g., shrimp, crab, lobster, cod) in Newfoundland, Canada and documents fisher behaviours, including the motivations behind decisions to invest, leave, diversify or join a fishery. To examine fisher behaviour and the implications for governability of mixed fisheries, several methods of data collection and analysis were used, including storytelling methods with fishers, fish processors, and fishing community residents, analysis of Atlantic Canadian fisheries policies, and a q-methodology activity with academics and governance actors to assess their subjective support for considering fisher behaviour at the policy level. Results reveal contradictions among actor perspectives about considering how and why fishers invest, leave, diversify and join a fishery that shape the capacity to address multiple social, economic, cultural, and ecological objectives. Furthermore, the structures and processes of governance were found to reinforce behavioural contradictions, as for example with limited capacity for coordination across governmental sectors and with academic social scientists, thus indicating systematic barriers to the strengthening fisheries governability in Atlantic Canada. As this research shows, an integrative and practical understanding of fisher behaviour is needed to help understand and address multiple objectives for the long-term sustainability of small-scale fisheries, and to develop policy processes with capacity to leverage human behaviour to strengthen governability.


Analyzing differing discourses in small-scale fisheries and conservation planning
Samantha Williams

The last decade has seen vast changes occurring in the South African small-scale fisheries sector. These changes were spurred on by the increased need to ensure more equitable distribution of and access to fisheries resources especially to communities and individuals who were


Thursday June 27, 2019 15:00 - 16:30
REC A1.05 Roeters Eiland Complex, University of Amsterdam